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I revised my resume recently and have shown it to some lawyers for feedback. Some like it, some don’t. Now what?

Q: I revised my resume recently and have shown it to some lawyers for feedback. Some like it, some don’t. Now what?

A: If you ask ten people for opinions on your resume, you may well get at least eight differing suggestions. That’s because some people still have in their heads the image of the resume we all had in law school. Others like quantification more than descriptions (e.g., had four bench trials in eight months); showcased accomplishments more than just task lists; lots of bullets; education at the bottom rather than at the top, and so on.

The key thing is that you like your resume, that you are comfortable with its layout and content, that you think it presents you well. If you’re not comfortable with it, or you make changes others suggest that seem a little iffy to you, you won’t be able to use it to advocate for yourself in the search as effectively as possible.

So take the resume advice, sift, weigh, and decide whether it’s good advice for you. Crafting a resume is an art, not a science. Ask only a few people who you think know something about legal resumes (e.g., a legal resume specialist, a legal career counselor, a lawyer who does a lot of hiring) and whose judgment you trust. Polling too many people will only result in confusion and, ultimately, a lack of confidence in your document. A good search can’t afford either.